Liberation of Shusha from occupation to end homesickness

LIBERATION OF SHUSHA FROM OCCUPATION TO END HOMESICKNESS

Displaced Azerbaijanis from Shusha, which was under Armenian occupation for over 28 years, are thrilled that their homeland is now liberated.

Azerbaijanis, the true owners of Shusha, are celebrating that their country's tri-color flag now hoists over their homeland.

Necefova's family in Baku are among those celebrating. Taleh Necefov, 54, and his wife Vesile Necefov expect to hear from state officials to return to Shusha, the city of their youth.

The couple married in Shusha in 1991. Yet, they had to flee their birthplace for Baku without being able to enjoy their happiness because of the Armenian occupation. For decades, the homesick couple raised their children, who have never been to Shusha.

Speaking to Anadolu Agency, Taleh Necefov said he dreamed of Shusha for 28 years until it was recently liberated.

"I miss and love Shusha, a beautiful city. We've had a home in Baku, but it is not the same as the homeland. Thanks to Allah, we have our homeland back", he noted.

Taleh also thanked the Turkish people and President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan for their support to Azerbaijan.

"Shusha means life to me. We grew up in the Upper Karabakh and were guests in Baku for 28 years. Thanks to Allah, we will be back in our homeland soon," the wife of Taleh, Vesile, added.

Another Azerbaijani from Shusha is 68-year-old Muzaffer Babayev. He is a teacher and poet who wrote about Shusha.

Expressing happiness over his love and homesickness for Shusha, Babayev said that for 28 years he has expected and prayed for returning to his homeland.

"Shusha is a sacred city for me. I never imagined myself without it. If they allow me, I would start my journey back to the homeland by foot," he noted.

Azerbaijan liberated several cities and nearly 300 of its settlements, including the strategic city of Shusha, and villages from the Armenian occupation in the past few weeks.

Relations between the former Soviet republics of Azerbaijan and Armenia have been tense since 1991 when the Armenian military occupied Nagorno-Karabakh, also known as Upper Karabakh, a territory recognized as part of Azerbaijan, and seven adjacent regions.

New clashes erupted Sept. 27 and ended in a Russia-brokered truce six weeks later.

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