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German gas regulator warns that Russia could cut gas supply entirely

Speaking to German public broadcaster ARD on Friday morning, Klaus Müller said the agency "cannot rule it out," adding that this was the reason behind the Federal Network Agency's decision to model various different scenarios.

DPA WORLD
Published June 24,2022
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The president of Germany's Federal Network Agency, which regulates essential services including gas supply, said on Friday it was possible that Russia could completely end gas deliveries to Germany.

Speaking to German public broadcaster ARD on Friday morning, Klaus Müller said the agency "cannot rule it out," adding that this was the reason behind the Federal Network Agency's decision to model various different scenarios.

"Most scenarios are not pretty and result in either too little gas at the end of winter or already - a very difficult situation - in the autumn or winter," Müller said.

Russia has already sharply decreased the volume of its natural gas deliveries to Germany through the Nord Stream 1 Baltic Sea pipeline in recent weeks, leaving industry and political leaders nervous over the planned shutdown of Nord Stream 1 for maintenance on July 11.

The annual gas outage normally lasts several days, but this year the concern for many is whether Russia will actually turn the gas back on again once maintenance is completed.

On Thursday, the German government declared the second level "alert stage" of its gas emergency plan following significant reduction in gas deliveries from Russia.

Müller urged the public to make energy savings wherever possible. "Everyone in industry and in their home life can contribute to this - and yes, this also includes jumpers, shower heads, turning the heating down a bit, all of this helps," he said.

In any case, Müller cautioned that German consumer heating bills could double or even triple, depending on the type of building being heated, and advised consumers to put money aside to pay bills and talk to their landlords towards the autumn. "There is still something that can be done now," he added.