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Ex-PKK member reveals secret nexus of terror group and opposition HDP

The terrorist identified only by his initials M.K. had been affiliated with the for the past four years. He surrendered in 's southeastern province of and revealed the of the political party, long accused by the government of terror links, and the PKK.

A PKK terrorist who surrendered to the Turkish government has confessed that the terror group and the opposition Peoples' Democratic Party (HDP) communicated using code words.

The terrorist identified only by his initials M.K. had been affiliated with the for the past four years. He surrendered in 's southeastern province of Diyarbakır and revealed the secret nexus of the political party, long accused by the government of terror links, and the PKK.

His confession comes at a time when scores of families have staged a protest outside the office in Diyarbakir demanding that the party officials bring back their sons, who were forcibly recruited by the PKK.

M.K said he met a person at an HDP rally he attended in the eastern province of Muş. He said he ran into him again at the provincial office of HDP in where he was lured into joining the .

He was taken to a group of 20 armed terrorists in Diyarbakır, he said, and then to an HDP office along with four other civilians in the southeastern province of Şanlıurfa.

"Those who sent us there told us to meet a terrorist code-named 'Baran' in the HDP office and tell him: 'We are looking for Huseyin the window-maker, we need windows'," M.K. said.

"[..] Terrorist Baran took us to a village near the Syrian border, where YPG [PKK's Syrian branch] terrorists greeted us," he added.

After receiving 15 days of terrorist training, M.K. said he was injured in clash. He had to get his spleen removed and suffered paralysis in his right leg.

Another civilian, identified by the initials B.B. said he escaped the terror group.

He said he was lured into joining the terrorists by two people he met at an HDP office in Turkey's eastern province of Bingöl.

He was taken to Syria's border town of Kobani, also known as Ayn Al-Arab.

"We spent the night on the fields. I told the 10 people with me and the group leader that I regretted coming.

"When I said I wanted to return, we quarreled. The group leader said: 'Go to hell, see what you have done, you have been revealed, they will catch you'.

"So, I escaped quickly."

In its more than 30-year terror campaign against Turkey, the PKK -- listed as a terrorist organization by Turkey, the U.S. and the EU -- has been responsible for the deaths of 40,000 people, including women, children and infants.

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