WORLD

Trump adviser warns Russia on military presence in Venezuela

The U.S. will treat foreign military deployments to Venezuela as a "direct threat" to regional stability and peace, President Donald Trump's national security advisor warned Friday. "We strongly caution actors external to the Western Hemisphere against deploying military assets to Venezuela, or elsewhere in the Hemisphere, with the intent of establishing or expanding military operations," Bolton said.

A top White House adviser on Friday issued a veiled warning to Russia about its military presence in Venezuela, saying the United States would consider any move to establish or expand military operations there a "direct threat" to international peace.

"We strongly caution actors external to the Western Hemisphere against deploying military assets to Venezuela, or elsewhere in the Hemisphere, with the intent of establishing or expanding military operations," White House national security adviser John Bolton said in a statement. "We will consider such provocative actions as a direct threat to international peace and security in the region."

"We will continue to defend and protect the interests of the United States, and those of our partners in the Western Hemisphere, which are rooted in a shared respect for liberty, security, and the rule of law," he added.

Trump earlier this week issued a stark warning to Russia, telling Moscow to withdraw its forces from Venezuela, and issued a veiled threat of military intervention to break the country's political deadlock.

Venezuela has been in the throes of humanitarian and economic crises amid a political deadlock between opposition leader Juan Guaido, who declared himself the country's interim president in January.

Dozens of nations, including the U.S., Canada and most Latin American states, have recognized Guaido as the country's leader as Washington has ramped up diplomatic and economic pressure on Caracas, including sanctioning its state-run oil company.

Maduro, who is strongly supported by Russia and Cuba, has refused to cede power, instead insisting he is the target of a U.S.-orchestrated coup.

The political stalemate comes as Venezuela grapples with a worsening economic crisis that has led to acute shortages of goods and which has repeatedly resulted in widespread power outages.

Its economy has been in precipitous decline following a global downturn in the price of crude oil, the country's main export.

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