TURKEY

More Kurdish families join sit-in protest against PKK's child abduction

The number of the Kurdish taking part in the protest has risen to 21 since a mother, , claimed her 17-year-old son had joined the ranks of the terror group through members of the (), launched a in front of the 's office on September 3.

Three more families on Wednesday joined a sit-in protest in southeastern Turkey outside the provincial office of a Turkish opposition political party long accused by the government of having links to the PKK terror group.

The number of the taking part in the protest has risen to 21 since a mother, Fevziye Çetinkaya, claimed her 17-year-old son had joined the ranks of the terror group through members of the Peoples' Democratic Party () in province, started the protest on Sept. 3.

"When they took my daughter [Songül], she was 15 years old and since then I haven't heard from her," said Fatma Akkuş, one of the recently joined mothers.

According to Akkuş, the PKK deceived her daughter 5 years ago and took her away.

"I watched the news about my daughter 's joining in the terror group on social media," Akkuş said reiterating her support for the protesting mothers.

Mehmet Karaman lost his 18-year-old son to PKK 22 years ago.

"I want to hear from my son anyway," Kahraman said adding that he is prepared for his son's demise.

"It tears my heart out. It's now 22 years and it's not easy,'' he said.

Halime Şehitoğlu and Macide Uslu, two women relatives, also joined the protest for their nephews.

Uslu, referring to the HDP members of the parliament, said: "Their children travel around Europe while ours are abducted. If they want they can bring our children back."

Last month, another mother, Hacire Akar, staged a similar protest near the party's office. Her son returned home a few days later giving hope to a number of mothers who suffer the same circumstances.

In its more than 30-year terror campaign against Turkey, the PKK -- listed as a terrorist organization by Turkey, the U.S. and the EU -- has been responsible for the deaths of some 40,000 people, including women, children and infants.

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